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/ The best english fairy tales





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The Master and His Pupil

There was once a very learned man in the north-country who knew all the languages under the sun, and who was acquainted with all the mysteries of the world. He had one big book bound in black calf and clasped with iron, and with iron corners, and chained to a table on the floor. When he read this book, he unlocked it with an iron key. This famous book contained all the secrets of the spiritual world. It told how many angels there were in heaven, and how they marched in their ranks, and sang, and what were their several functions, and what was the name of each great angel of might. And it told of the demons, how many of them there were, and what were their several powers, and their labours, and their names, and how they might be summoned,[1]1
how they might be summoned


[]
and how tasks might be imposed on them,[2]2
how tasks might be imposed on them


[]
and how they might be chained to be as slaves to man.[3]3
to be as slaves to man


[]

Now the master had a pupil who was a foolish lad, and he acted as servant to the great master. The boy was never allowed[4]4
the boy was never allowed


[]
to look into the black book, hardly to enter the private room.

One day the master was out. The lad was very curious. So he hurried to the chamber where his master kept his wonderful apparatus for changing copper into gold, and lead into silver.

There was his magic mirror in which he could see all that was passing in the world. There also was the shell which when held to the ear[5]5
which when held to the ear ,


[]
whispered all the words that were spoken by anyone the master desired to know about. The lad tried in vain[6]6
in vain


[]
with the crucibles to turn copper and lead into gold and silver. He looked long and vainly into the mirror; smoke and clouds passed over it, but he saw nothing plain. And the shell produced to his ear only indistinct murmurings, like the breaking of distant seas on an unknown shore. I can do nothing, he said; as I dont know the right words to utter, and they are locked up in that magic book.

He looked round, and, see! the book was not locked. The master had forgotten to lock it before he went out. The boy rushed to it, and opened the volume. It was written with red and black ink, and much of it he could not understand. But he put his finger on a line and spelled it through.

At once the room was darkened, and the house trembled; aclap of thunder rolled through the passage and the old room, and there stood before him a horrible, horrible form, breathing fire, and with eyes like burning lamps. It was the demon, whom he had called up[7]7
whom he had called up


[]
to serve him.

Set me a task![8]8
Set me a task! !


[]
said he, with a voice like the roaring of an iron furnace.

The boy only trembled, and his hair stood up.

Set me a task, or I shall strangle you!

But the lad could not speak. Then the evil spirit stepped towards him, and putting forth his hands touched his throat. The fingers burned his flesh. Set me a task!

Water that flower, cried the boy in despair, pointing to a geranium which stood in a pot on the floor. Instantly the spirit left the room, but in another instant he returned with a barrel on his back, and poured its contents over the flower; and again and again he went and came, and poured more and more water, till the floor of the room was ankle-deep.[9]9
the floor of the room was ankle-deep


[]

Enough, enough! gasped the lad; but the demon did not hear him. The lad didnt know the words by which to send him away, and still he fetched water.

It rose to the boys knees and still more water was poured. It mounted to his waist, and the demon still kept on bringing barrels full. It rose to his armpits, and he scrambled to the table-top. And now the water in the room stood up to the window and washed against the glass, and around his feet on the table. It still rose; it reached his breast. The poor boy cried, but all was useless. The evil spirit was pouring and pouring and pouring water. But the master remembered on his journey that he had not locked his book, and therefore returned, and at the moment when the water was bubbling about the pupils chin, rushed into the room and spoke the words which cast the demon back into his fiery home.

1. :

1.A learned man had a book in which he had the knowledge to control angels.

2.A learned man had a book in which he had the knowledge to control demons.

3.A learned man had a book in which he had the knowledge to control people.

4.A learned man had a book in which he had the knowledge to control stupid pupils.


2.What is a demon?

1.a supernatural being, often depicted in humanoid form with feathered wings on the back and halo around the head

2.a mythological human with the ability to shapeshift into a wolf

3.a supernatural, malevolent being

4.an animated corpse raised by magical means


3.What is magic?

1.the act of producing musical sounds with the voice

2.a form of communication between two demons

3.a performing art that entertains audiences

4.the use of paranormal methods to manipulate natural forces


4.What did the foolish pupil one day do with the magic book?

1.The foolish pupil decided to burn it.

2.The foolish pupil brought it to the library.

3.The foolish pupil did absolutely nothing.

4.The foolish pupil began to study.


5.What did the demon do when the pupil summoned him?

1.The demon tried to steal the book.

2.The demon appeared and demanded a task from the foolish pupil.

3.The demon disappeared at once.

4.The demon wanted to play magic games.


6. :

The demon went on watering the flower until ____________________________________.


7. :

1.The master remembered that he had left his book unlocked, returned and dispelled the demon.

2.The master remembered that he had left his money at home and returned.

3.The master did not want to dispell the demon.

4.The master never returned.


8.Why did the pupil order the demon to water the flower?

1.Just in case.[10]10
Just in case. .


[]

2.He wanted to have a good garden.

3.He liked plants very much.

4.He wanted to save his life.


9. :

"Enough, enough!" cried the lad; but the demon did not hear him. Why?

1.Because the demon was deaf.

2.Because the lad didn't know the words by which to send the demon away.

3.Because the demon was angry with the boy.

4.Because the demon did not speak English.


10. :

The water______________to the boy's knees and still more water was poured.

1.rise

2.rising

3.rose

4.risen


11. :

in with on out

The master remembered his journey that he had not locked his book, and therefore returned.


12. :

1.How many persons are mentioned in the story?

2.What is the master's occupation?

3.What do magicians usually do?

4.What do you like and what don't you like in the characters?

5.What would you do if you were the main character of the story?

6.What is the end of the story?

7.Retell the story.


13. :



1.A learned man had a book in which he had the knowledge to control demons.

2.A demon is a supernatural, malevolent being.

3: the use of paranormal methods to manipulate natural forces

4.The foolish pupil one day found it open and read a spell from it.

5.The demon appeared and demanded a task from the foolish pupil.

6.The demon went on watering the flower until the room was filling with water.

7.The master remembered that he had left his book unlocked, returned and dispelled the demon.

8.He wanted to save his life.

9.Because the lad didn't know the words by which to send the demon away.

10.rose; The water rose to the boy's knees and still more water was poured.

11.

The master remembered on his journey that he had not locked his book, and therefore returned.

13.



The Golden Arm

Here was once a man who travelled the land all over[11]11
who travelled the land all over


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in search of a wife. He saw young and old, rich and poor, pretty and plain, and could not meet with one to his mind.[12]12
could not meet with one to his mind


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At last he found a woman, young, fair, and rich, who possessed a right arm of solid gold. He married her at once, and thought no man so fortunate as he was.[13]13
no man so fortunate as he was ,


[]
They lived happily together, but, though he wished people to think otherwise, he was fonder of the golden arm[14]14
he was fonder of the golden arm


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than of all his wifes gifts besides.

At last she died. The husband put on black clothes, and pulled the longest face at the funeral. But in the middle of the night, he dug up the body, and cut off the golden arm. He hurried home to hide his treasure, and thought no one would know.

The following night he put the golden arm under his pillow, and was just falling asleep, when the ghost of his dead wife glided into the room. Stalking up to the bedside it drew the curtain, and looked at him reproachfully. Pretending not to be afraid, he spoke to the ghost, and said, "What have you done with your red cheeks?"

"All withered and wasted away," replied the ghost, in a hollow tone.

"What have you done with your red rosy lips?"

"All withered and wasted away."

"What have you done with your golden hair?"

"All withered and wasted away."

"What have you done with your Golden Arm?"

"You have it!"

The Fish and the Ring

Once upon a time, there was a mighty Baron in the North Country who was a great magician and knew everything that would come to pass.[15]15
knew everything that would come to pass ,


[]
So one day, when his little boy was four years old, he looked into the Book of Fate[16]16
the Book of Fate


[]
to see what would happen to him. And to his dismay, he found that his son would wed a lowly maid[17]17
a lowly maid


[]
that had just been born in a small house. Now the Baron knew the father of the little girl was very, very poor, and he had five children already. So he called for his horse, and rode to the fathers house, and saw him sitting by the door, sad and doleful. So he dismounted and went up to him and said, What is the matter, my good man? And the man said, Well, your honour,[18]18
your honour


[]
the fact is, I have five children already, and now the sixth one comes, a little girl, and where to get the bread from to fill their mouths, thats more than I can say.

Dont cry, my dear man, said the Baron. If thats your trouble, I can help you. Ill take away the last little one, and you wont have to bother about her.

Thank you kindly, sir, said the man; and he went in and brought out the little girl and gave her to the Baron, who mounted his horse and rode away with her. And when he got by the bank of the river, he threw the little girl into the river, and rode off to his castle.

But the little girl didnt sink; her clothes kept her up for a time,[19]19
kept her up for a time


[]
and she floated, and she floated, till she was cast ashore just in front of a fishermans hut. There the fisherman found her, and took pity on the poor little girl and took her into his house, and she lived there till she was fifteen years old. So she became a fine handsome girl.

One day it happened that the Baron went out hunting[20]20
went out hunting


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with some companions along the banks of the river, and stopped at the fishermans hut to get a drink, and the girl came out to give it to them. They all noticed her beauty, and one of them said to the Baron, You can read fates, Baron, whom will she marry, how do you think?

Oh! thats easy to guess, said the Baron; some farmer or other. But Ill cast her horoscope. Come here, girl, and tell me on what day you were born.

I dont know, sir, said the girl, I was picked up just here. The river brought me down[21]21
the river brought me down


[]
about fifteen years ago.

Then the Baron knew who she was, and when they went away, he rode back and said to the girl, Listen to me, girl, I will make your fortune. Take this letter to my brother, and you will be settled for life. And the girl took the letter and said she would go. Now this is what he had written in the letter:

Dear brother,

Take the bearer and put her to death immediately.

So soon after the girl left, and slept for the night at a little inn. Now that very night[22]22
now that very night


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a band of robbers broke into the inn, and searched the girl, who had no money, and only the letter. So they opened this and read it. The captain of the robbers took a pen and paper and wrote this letter:

Dear brother,

Take the bearer and marry her to my son immediately.

And then he gave it to the girl. So she went on to the Barons brother, a noble knight, with whom the Barons son was staying. When she gave the letter to his brother, he gave orders for the wedding to be prepared at once, and they were married that very day.[23]23
that very day


[]

Soon after, the Baron himself came to his brothers castle, and what was his surprise! But he took the girl out for a walk, as he said, along the cliffs. And when he got her all alone, he took her by the arms, and was going to throw her over. But she begged hard for her life.[24]24
she begged hard for her life


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I have not done anything, she said, please do not kill me, I will do whatever you wish. I will never see you or your son again till you desire it. Then the Baron took off his gold ring and threw it into the sea, saying, Never let me see your face till you can show me that ring; and he let her go.[25]25
and he let her go


[]

The poor girl wandered on and on, till at last she came to a great nobles castle,[26]26
great nobles castle


[]
and she said that she could do any work. So they gave her some kitchen work, and she began to cook food.

One day the Baron and his brother and his son, her husband, came up to the nobles house. She didnt know what to do; but thought they would not see her in the castle kitchen. So she went back to her work with a sigh, and set to cleaning a huge big fish that was to be boiled for their dinner. And, as she was cleaning it, she saw something shine inside it.[27]27
she saw something shine inside it , -


[]
What do you think she found? Why, there was the Barons ring, the very one he had thrown over the cliff.[28]28
the very one he had thrown over the cliff ,


[]
She was glad indeed to see it, you may be sure. Then she cooked the fish as nicely as she could, and served it up. Well, when the fish came on the table, the guests liked it so well that they asked the noble who cooked it. He said he didnt know, but called to his servants, Hey, there, send the cook who cooked that fine fish. So they went down to the kitchen and told the girl she was wanted in the hall.

When the guests saw such a young and beautiful cook they were surprised. But the Baron was very angry. So the girl went up to him with her hand before her with the ring on it; and she put it down before him on the table. Then at last the Baron saw that no one could fight against Fate, and he handed her to a seat and announced to all the company that this was his sons true wife. And he took her and his son home to his castle; and they all lived happy.

The Rose-tree

There was once upon a time a good man who had two children: agirl by a first wife,[29]29
a girl by a first wife


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and a boy by the second. The girl was as white as milk, and her lips were like cherries. Her hair was like golden silk, and it hung to the ground. Her brother loved her dearly, but her wicked stepmother hated her. Child, said the stepmother one day, go to the grocers shop and buy me a pound of candles. She gave her the money; and the little girl went, bought the candles, and started on her return.[30]30
and started on her return


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But there was a stile on her way. How to cross it? She put down the candles while she got over the stile. Suddenly a dog came and ran off with the candles.

The girl went back to the grocers, and the grocer gave her a second bunch. She came to the stile, set down the candles, and began to climb it over. Again came the dog and ran off with the candles.

The girl went again to the grocers, and the grocer gave her a third bunch. But the same thing happened![31]31
But the same thing happened! !


[]
The big dog came again and ran off with the candles as usual.

Then the girl came to her stepmother crying, because she had spent all the money and had lost three bunches of candles.

The stepmother was angry, but she pretended not to mind the loss.[32]32
she pretended not to mind the loss ,


[]
She said to the child, Come, lay your head on my lap that I may comb your hair. So the little girl laid her head in the womans lap, who proceeded to comb the yellow hair. And when she combed the hair fell over her knees, and rolled right down to the ground.

Then the stepmother hated her more for the beauty of her hair; so she said to her, I cannot part your hair on my knee, fetch a billet of wood. So she fetched it. Then said the stepmother, I cannot part your hair with a comb, fetch me an axe. So she fetched it.

Now, said the wicked woman, lay your head down on the billet while I part your hair.

Well! she laid down her little golden head without fear; and whist![33]33
whist! !


[]
down came the axe,[34]34
down came the axe


[]
and it was off.[35]35
it was off ()


[]
So the mother wiped the axe and laughed.

Then she took the heart and liver of the little girl, and she stewed them and brought them into the house for supper. The husband tasted them and shook his head. He said they tasted very strangely. She gave some to the little boy, but he would not eat. She tried to force him, but he refused, and ran out into the garden, and took up his little sister, and put her in a box, and buried the box under a rose-tree; and every day he went to the tree and wept, till his tears ran down on the box.

One day the rose-tree flowered. It was spring, and there among the flowers was a white bird. The bird sang, and sang, and sang like an angel out of heaven. Then it flew away. It went to a cobbler's shop, and perched itself on a tree nearby; and thus it sang,


"My wicked mother slew me,
My dear father ate me,
My little brother whom I love
Sits below, and I sing above
Stick, stock, stone dead."

Sing again that beautiful song, asked the shoemaker.

"Please give me those little red shoes that you are making."

The cobbler gave the shoes, and the bird sang the song; then flew to a tree in front of a watchmaker's,[36]36
watchmaker


[]
and sang:


"My wicked mother slew me,
My dear father ate me,
My little brother whom I love
Sits below, and I sing above
Stick, stock, stone dead."

Oh, the beautiful song! sing it again, sweet bird, asked the watchmaker.

"Please give me that gold watch and chain in your hand." The jeweller gave the watch and chain. The bird took it in one foot, the shoes in the other, and repeated the song. Then the bird flew away to where[37]37
flew away to where ,


[]
three millers were picking a millstone. The bird perched on a tree and sang:


"My wicked mother slew me,
My dear father ate me,
My little brother whom I love
Sits below, and I sing above
Stick!"

Then one of the men put down his tool and looked up from his work,


Stock!

Then the second miller's man laid aside his tool and looked up,


Stone!

Then the third miller's man laid down his tool and looked up,


Dead!

Then all three cried out with one voice: Oh, what a beautiful song! Sing it, sweet bird, again.

"Please put the millstone round my neck," said the bird. The men did what the bird wanted and away to the tree it flew with the millstone round its neck, the red shoes in one foot, and the gold watch and chain in the other. It sang the song and then flew home. It rattled the millstone against the eaves of the house, and the stepmother said, "It thunders." Then the little boy ran out to see the thunder, and down dropped the red shoes at his feet.

It rattled the millstone against the eaves of the house once more, and the stepmother said again: "It thunders." Then the father ran out and down fell the chain about his neck.

Father and son came in, laughing and saying, "See, what fine things the thunder has brought us!" Then the bird rattled the millstone against the eaves of the house a third time; and the stepmother said, "It thunders again, perhaps the thunder has brought something for me," and she ran out. But alas! When she stepped outside the door, the millstone fell down on her head; and so she died.

1. :

1.The girl was very beautiful, but her stepmother was nicer.

2.The girl was very beautiful, and although her brother loved her, his mother hated her.

3.The girl was very beautiful, and although her brother did not love her, his mother adored her.

4.The girl was not beautiful, but her brother loved her.


2.Who is a stepmother?

1.A stepmother is a woman who has raised a child, given birth to a child.

2.A stepmother is a person who is the sister or sister-in-law of a parent.

3.A stepmother is one's father's wife and not one's natural mother.

4.A stepmother is the sister of one's spouse.


3.Where did the stepmother send the little girl?

1.The stepmother sent the little girl to the village to bring some water.

2.The stepmother sent the little girl to the her father.

3.The stepmother sent the little girl to the forest to pick up some berries.

4.The stepmother sent the little girl to the store to buy candles.


4.How many times did the girl put down the candles to climb a stile, and a dog steal them?

1.Three times, the girl put down the candles to climb a stile, and a dog stole them.

2.Two times, the girl put down the candles to climb a stile, and a dog stole them.

3.Four times, the girl put down the candles to climb a stile, and a dog stole them.





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